100 Bottles of Beer on the Wall…

Here’s a simple explanation of the US tax system. I love it. It shows explicitly why there’s little sense in complaining about “tax cuts for the wealthy.”

Under the Fair Tax, everybody would pay $10 for thier beer.

ARRRRRGGGGGGGHHHHHHHH!

I am so sick of Jim Martin’s commercials. (Jim Martin(D) is running against incumbent Saxby Chambliss(R) for US Senate here in Georgia.)

Here’s one of the commercials against Saxby Chambliss. Several of the commercials against Chambliss mention a 23% national sales tax that Chambliss supports. Well, yeah, he does support a 23% national sales tax. It’s the Fair Tax (which I support). Naturally, I have several problems with Democrats and Martin using the Fair Tax against Chambliss.

The commercials say that the Fair Tax would cause people to pay more for groceries. That’s not completely true. Sure, people would pay 23% taxes for groceries in the store. But before a person ever pays for groceries (or the taxes), that person would receive a prebate equal to the amount of money they would be expected to pay for grocery taxes.  So, in essence, there will be no grocery taxes (or taxes on essential items like clothes, for that matter).

The commercials make it seem like the Fair Tax would be enacted on top of income tax. That is not at all true. The Fair Tax legislation would abolish the IRS. The Fair Tax is intended to replace the IRS as the primary means of funding the federal government. It will not be enacted on top of the income tax. That runs counter to the purpose of the Fair Tax.

The Americans for Fair Taxation (the main people behind the Fair Tax) have a Hall of Shame up with Martin featured prominentlyas someone who has lied about the Fair Tax. I love the Pinocchio nose. That is hilarious.

Oh, and how does the Fair Tax stack up against the Messiah’s the the Old Guy’s tax plans? Here you go.

LATER: Dear God. I just answered the phone; it was one of those automatic robocalls against Chambliss. At the same time, that stupid anti-Fair Tax/anti-Chambliss commercial was playing on the TV. At. The. Same. Time.  Oy!

Just Any Other Day? Someday

Fair Warning: This is a rant. Not reasoned. Not well thought out. Not in any particular order. Just something I have to get off my chest every April 15th. Argh.

I’m not a fan of income taxes, on both a practical and a philosophical level. Why does the government need to know how much money we make? It’s none of their business if I make $2 a year or $2 million. If the government needs a source of income, they can collect retail tax. Taxing my retail spending is a perfectly acceptable exchange for purchasing something on US soil. Taxing my income is an intrusion. More than that, it’s a claim. In effect, a government that collects income tax is saying that their claim to the money you make is superior to your claim to the money you make. Socialism, anyone? [And I hate to use the C word, but isn’t a progressive income tax listed by Karl Marx as one of the ten planks in “The Communist Manifesto?”]

As if intruding upon your privacy isn’t enough, they threaten your freedom if for some reason your taxes weren’t paid. And collecting income taxes leads to all kinds of mischief by those who collect it. It’s a secretive exchange that leads to shenanigans and hijinks by the people who preside over income tax law. They use tax legislation, not to produce income necessary for the running of government, but to purchase votes via preferential treatment for certain constituents.

I despise everything for which income taxes stand. And I loathe the organization that collects them. I’d go on, but I just now (unexpectedly) ran out of steam. Sigh. Thank goodness April 15th only comes once a year. I couldn’t be this angry every day.

So look at the Fair Tax. If you decide to support it, do something about it. Contact your representative. Really, it’s the best, most feasible solution for abolishing the IRS. I’m currently reading Neal Boortz’s newest Fair Tax book. I highly recommend reading his two Fair Tax books for more information about the Fair Tax.